Palais du Roi de Rome at Rambouillet

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Ordered by Louis XVI from the architect Jacques-Jean Tévenin 51732 - 1813), the hôtel du Gouvernment at Rambouillet, built between 1784 and 1787 passed into private hands after the Revolution, and then joined the civil imperial list in 1804. Napoleon I commissioned the architect Auguste Famin (1776-1859) to reconstruct the edifice, which was destined for his son, the King of Rome, born in 1811.
Western Pavilion © Ville de Rambouillet

In August 1806, the architect Auguste Famin, architect in chief of the chateau de Rambouillet, was charged with the reconstruction of the government building of Rambouillet, which Napoleon destined for his son, the King of Rome, born in 1811. Famin won the Prix de Rome in 1801, Famin had stayed at the Academie Française in Rome from 1801 to 1806. On his return to France, he had helped Fontaine with work projects at the Chateau de Rambouillet, before becoming head architect.

<i> Western Pavilion © Ville de Rambouillet </i>” /> <BR>Commisioned by Louis XVI from the architect Jacques-Jean Thévenin (1732-1813), amongst a series of royal buildings (bailiwicks, prisons, the hôtel de la Venerie), the hôtel du Gouvernement was built between 1784 and 1787. It is comprised of a main building enclosed by two pavilions, which extend to the street via an low wing, which makes up the central courtayrd. The south facade opens onto a garden which adjoins the royal gardens. Made a national building after the Revolution, it was sold to Joseph-Yvon Paulian, deputy of Saint-Domingue who lived in Paris, who little by little sold off the stones of the main body of the building. <BR><BR> <BR> <BR> <BR><!-- /paragraph2 --></p>
<p><!-- paragraph3 --><img src=http://www.rambouillet.fr/

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