An international scholarly online history journal on First and Second Empire subjects: articles, bibliographies, book reviews, in english and in french
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THE MAGAZINE / NEWS

Magazine and News is a place where, every day, we bring you not only what’s going on in the Napoleonic world and interviews with those leading Napoleonic history today, but we also offer you Napoleonic pastimes, entertainments, and even recipes. Enjoy!

Latest updates :

Sites, musées et monuments : Musée des Lettres et Manuscrits (Brussels)
Bon appetit! : Turkey in the form of a turtle
Interview : Alexander Mikaberidze on Russian Voices of the Napoleonic Wars
anglegauche angledroit
 
 

BOOKS ALREADY PUBLISHED

Each month we present an important recent book, and every week we report on recent publications.
You can also find the books published in previous years by using the scrollbar menu at the bottom of the page. To add one or more books to your «My napoleon.org » account, click on the title(s) and then select «Add to my account».

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PROCHASKA Frank, Eminent Victorians on American Democracy: the view from Albion


<i>© Oxford University Press</i>

© Oxford University Press

Description:
From the publishers:
Eminent Victorians on American Democracy surveys a wide range of British opinion on the United States in the nineteenth century and highlights the views of John Stuart Mill, Walter Bagehot, Sir Henry Maine, and James Bryce, who wrote extensively on American government and society. America was significant to them not only because it was the world's most advanced democracy, but also because it was a political experiment that was seen to anticipate the future of Britain.
 
The Victorians made a memorable contribution to the continuing debate over the character and origins of democracy through their perceptive examination of issues ranging from the US Constitution to its practical application, from the Supreme Court to the party system. Their trenchant commentary punctures several popular American assumptions, not least the idea of 'exceptionalism'. To Victorian commentators, the bonds of kinship, law, and language were of great significance; and while they did not see the United States as having a unique destiny, they rallied to an 'Anglo-American exceptionalism', which reflected their sense of a shared transatlantic history.
 
What distinguishes the Victorian writers was their willingness to examine the US Constitution dispassionately at a time when Americans treated it as a sacred document. Although the United States has changed dramatically since they wrote, much of their commentary remains remarkably prescient, if only because the American government retains so much of its eighteenth-century character. Today, when rival American priesthoods see the Constitution in the light of their particular altars, it is worth revisiting what leading Victorians had to say about it. It may come as a shock to American readers.

Place and publisher: Oxford University Press

Date of publication: 2012

Number of pages: 192


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