Elysée Palace

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Elysée Palace

This palace, which dates back to the 18th century, became in 1805 the official residence of Joachim Murat, the Governor of Paris at the time, and his wife Caroline, Napoleon's sister. Restored by Vignon and Thibault, the palace owes two of its most splendid rooms to these two architects: the “Salon Murat” and the “Salon d'Argent” named after the colour of the paneling and of the furniture chosen by Murat.

After Murat was given the Kingdom of Naples in 1808, the palace was renamed “Elysée-Napoléon”. Josephine then lived there, as did Napoleon himself in 1809, 1812, 1813, and during the “Cent-Jours”. And it was probably in the Salon d'Argent that he signed his second abdication on 22nd June, 1815. Alexander I took up residence in the palace in 1814, and the Duke of Wellington moved in after the Emperor's departure.
 
It was not until 1849, when the Prince Louis-Napoleon was elected President of the Republic, that the palace was inhabited again on a permanent basis. In fact, it was here with Morny that the future Emperor prepared his coup d'état.
 
During the Second Empire, the palace became a used most of all as a place of entertainment. Its famous guests include Eugénie and her mother during the interval between her engagement and her wedding, Queen Victoria in 1855, Tzar Alexander II, Sultan Abdulaziz, Emperor Francis-Josef, King Oscar of Sweden during the World Fair in 1867, the Viceroy of Egypt, and Ibrahim Pacha in 1869. Many alterations took place at the time: the wings were erected, the porch was rebuilt and turned into a triumphal arch, a ballroom was created and the interior decoration transformed.
 
Since 1873, the palace has been the official residence of the President of the French Republic.
 
Click here for an interactive visit of the Palace (external link in French).

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